Blog

Algo Trading: Sentiment Ratio

The Sentiment Ratio indicator gauges current Market Sentiment between -100% and 100%, where lower than -40% is considered Bearish and higher than 40% Bullish. The channel between the two is considered Neutral.

The indicator has been particularly effective on H4 charts when used to confirm the direction of potential trading signals. On shorter term charts, when the indicator crosses -40 or 40 back to Neutral, it can be effective when indicating potential swings; for example, a sell signal when the indicator crosses below 40 and a buy signal when the indicator crosses above -40.

Link: https://www.mql5.com/en/market/product/40614

Algo Trading: Multi Trendlines

The Multi Trendlines indicator automatically draws the dominant trendlines on the current chart.

The indicator looks for the 5 best Up trends and the 5 best Down trends as at the current price, drawing each trendline if filter conditions are met.

The price relative to the trendline values can be incorporated into automated trading strategies or used as a tool for manual trading.

Link: https://www.mql5.com/en/market/product/40661

TSS Markets

Algorithmic trading of the currency markets using the proprietary Trendline Syncing System (TSS).

Positions are based on the best entry and exit points in the rhythmic movements of trending markets, evaluated across multiple timeframes, applying aggregated Analyst pull ratios, Sentiment Ratio analysis, and economic news event actuals versus forecasts.

The Foreign Exchange Market is the optimum asset class in which to balance a healthy Risk/Reward ratio in all economic and political conditions. Trading by investors adds to market depth and decreases the costs of businesses, pension funds and consumers to exchange money. In normal circumstances, market currency price adjustments are a natural and necessary safety valve to an economy. Ethically (and also from a risk management perspective) we do not trade non-stable currencies.

Our investment approach is to execute strategy plans formulated by special configurations of the TSS model, which creates automated algorithmic trades and ensures positions are implemented accurately in the currency markets 24 hours a day.

Journal 2020-08-15

Random thought, slipping into British mode…

Despite its reputation, England can be a nice place for the weather. We have about six months when it can be very pleasant to be here, say from about mid-April to mid-October. The dark, cold and damp months of December to February take some extra effort to appreciate.

I prefer long sunny days in the low 20Cs (70Fs).

(yawn)

Podcast #3

Hello and welcome.

A Little Bit of Drama

Excerpts (in order of appearance):

  • Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare.
  • Hamlet in Hamlet by William Shakespeare.
  • Antony in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare.
  • Iago in Othello by William Shakespeare.
  • Mike in West by Steven Berkoff.

Music:

Journal 2020-08-12

I appreciate the story-telling of real human experience, truthfully expressing core feelings that are shared by people across cultures and time. Very generally, I tend to turn to Shakespeare for plays and poetry; and Dostoevsky for deep psychological novels. Some other great writers I like to read are Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Thomas Hardy, Anton Chekhov, Leo Tolstoy and Victor Hugo.

Journal 2020-08-11

Reading Hamlet.

It’s been done millions of times, but my instinctive interpretation of Hamlet’s “To Be or Not To Be” soliloquy is a bit different from the many performances I have seen. In fact it may be unhelpful seeing other people’s performances because the blueprints distract from my own relationship with the words.

Every single person has both uniqueness and a shared oneness with everybody else. What is interesting is finding the individuality and playing with it, rather than blandly mimicking other people or current socialised expectations.

Podcast #2

“I HATE THE MOOR”

– IAGO IN OTHELLO BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ACT 1, SCENE 3)
A Little Bit of Drama

Iago is such a terrifying character because he revels in what he is doing. The motivating reasons can be analysed: broken pride; a sense of betrayal; jealousy; ambition; desire for power over others; or even unrequited love turned sour, if you want to read it that way. It’s true that villains often fool themselves into believing their actions are justified or the fault of fate or caused by others; but the main factor with Iago is the huge elephant in the room. Iago knows he is the villain and sadistically enjoys the suffering he causes. His motivation is the full embracing of enmity.

IAGO:

I hate the Moor: 
And it is thought abroad, that ‘twixt my sheets 
He has done my office: I know not if’t be true; 
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind, 
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well; 
The better shall my purpose work on him. 
Cassio’s a proper man: let me see now: 
To get his place and to plume up my will 
In double knavery—How, how? Let’s see:— 
After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear 
That he is too familiar with his wife. 
He hath a person and a smooth dispose 
To be suspected, framed to make women false. 
The Moor is of a free and open nature, 
That thinks men honest that but seem to be so, 
And will as tenderly be led by the nose 
As asses are. 
I have’t. It is engender’d. Hell and night 
Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light.

Podcast #1

“FRIENDS, ROMANS, COUNTRYMEN”

– ANTONY IN JULIUS CAESAR BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ACT 3, SCENE 2)
A Little Bit of Drama

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men–
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

Human Cyborg 2.0?

Given how technology is moving, all the functions of your phone will be migrated directly into your brain. The “screen” will be projected into your vision and options chosen by thoughts.

All vision, sound, thoughts and feelings could be recorded. You could download and replay any recording from yourself or anybody else. Communication by mindscapes could replace the spoken and written word.

Your mind could operate any physical body.

Your perception of reality could be changed. Undesired emotions or detrimental thought patterns could be switched-off.

You could instantly download data and skills and have greatly augmented cognitive processing speeds.

Your thoughts could interact with artificial intelligence that could calculate the most efficient algorithm for any process you wish to undertake.

This isn’t fanciful thinking, it’s the implied intention for the not too distant future. The unasked question is to what extent this is really desirable.

Of course any totalitarian regime could easily control their population by these means. An empowered sadist could run amok in all the enslaved minds.

Philosophically it makes me wonder, what is it to be a human being? Practically it makes me certain, humans have to become worthy of the knowledge we are gaining.

Journal 2020-07-31

Iago is such a terrifying character because he revels in what he is doing. The motivating reasons can be analysed: broken pride; a sense of betrayal; jealousy; ambition; desire for power over others; or even unrequited love turned sour, if you want to read it that way. It’s true that villains often fool themselves into believing their actions are justified or the fault of fate or caused by others; but the main factor with Iago is the huge elephant in the room. Iago knows he is the villain and sadistically enjoys the suffering he causes. His motivation is the full embracing of enmity.

Journal 2020-07-30

Wasn’t Shakespeare amazing. It would be so interesting to find out how his genius developed, what he saw and experienced in his life that helped him write such beauty and comprehend so deeply the human material condition in all its different aspects. I can think of other notable geniuses in history — Mozart in music, Newton in science etc. — but Shakespeare is a sort of mythical other, shrouded in mystery, whose breadth of insight has the greatest impact on me.

Journal 2020-07-06

An obvious point is that there is greater chance of releasing the magic if not consumed by self-aggrandizement or conforming to other people’s expectations, especially if the current norms are harmful and wrong. Success in transcendent goals is not the same as success in negotiating positions of status in the current society, which of course will change with the relentless passage of time. It just so happens, however, that those people who were motivated by intrinsic value rather than their own psychological desires produced the best long-lasting examples of beauty and creative human potential.

Journal 2020-07-05

Reading about Dostoevsky. There is certainly a trend in history that the most interesting thinkers and artists tended to be outsiders for defining periods; and sometimes the untamed spark that made them great was dampened when invited in from the wilderness. Dostoevsky’s spark seemed to ignite after the more eventful stages of his life; in particular after his death sentence for sedition was commuted at the last minute to hard labour in a Siberian gulag, writing four classic novels after this period.